10 Canadian Foods That Americans Consider Strange

Food is a source of cultural pride and identity for Americans and Canadians. The two nations share numerous culinary similarities, but a few Canadian creations undoubtedly disgust Americans. These 10 Canadian foods may seem quirky to Americans. 

Poutine

Poutine is a beloved Canadian dish of crispy french fries generously topped with rich gravy and squeaky cheese curds. The combination of flavors and textures creates an indulgent experience for people who appreciate it. While this dish is a staple in Canadian cuisine, it may not appeal to Americans, who may find it distasteful. 

Ketchup Chips

Ketchup chips are a beloved snack among Canadians. These crispy potato chips coated with ketchup seasoning have been a staple in Canadian pantries since the 1980s. However, Americans may find this flavor combination strange and opt for more traditional chip flavors like barbecue, sour cream, and onion.  

Nanaimo Bars

Nanaimo bars are a classic Canadian dessert with a crumb base, custard middle, and chocolate top layer. This sweet treat is a staple at holiday parties and potlucks in Canada. Americans may find the combination of ingredients odd and prefer more familiar desserts like apple pie or brownies.  

Montreal Style Bagels

Montreal-style bagels are a popular breakfast food in Canada. They are smaller, denser, and sweeter than the traditional New York-style bagel. Americans may find this deviation from their beloved breakfast staple strange, but Canadians swear by its deliciousness.

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Butter Tarts

Butter tarts are a quintessentially Canadian dessert with a flaky pastry crust filled with a gooey mixture of butter, sugar, and eggs. This sweet treat is similar to the famous American pecan pie but without the nuts. Americans may find this dessert too rich for their taste buds.  

Moose Meat

Moose meat is a protein source commonly consumed in Canada, especially in the northern regions. It has a distinct gamey taste and is often cooked as steaks, burgers, or stews. Americans may find eating this large animal off-putting and stick to more traditional meats like beef, chicken, and pork.  

Seal Flipper Pie

Seal flipper pie is Newfoundland’s famous dish. It contains minced seal flippers cooked in a savory pie crust. While this traditional meal may hold cultural significance for Newfoundlanders, Americans may find it distasteful and controversial due to harvesting seals for their fur and meat. 

Cod Tongues

Cod tongues are a traditional dish in the Maritimes region of Canada. They are small, breaded, and fried pieces of cod tongue with a chewy texture. While this dish may be a delicacy for Canadians, Americans may find it distasteful.  

Ketchup on Mac and Cheese

Ketchup is a condiment Americans cherish to enhance the flavor of burgers, hot dogs, and fries. However, across the border, Canadians elevate it to new heights by adding ketchup to mac and cheese, a culinary combination that may appear peculiar to American counterparts.

Pease Pudding

Pease pudding is a traditional British-Canadian dish with split yellow peas, onions, and spices. It’s usually served as a side dish or spread on toast. While it may seem like an odd choice for Americans, Canadians have been enjoying this meal since the 19th century.

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